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Look At This 100-Year-Old Picture For 1 Second. What You See Reveals Something About Your Brain.

Look At This 100-Year-Old Picture For 1 Second. What You See Reveals Something About Your Brain.

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This image is one of the world's most famous optical illusions— and it has fascinated and puzzled people for more than a hundred years.

The drawing was first used by American psychologist Joseph Jastrow in 1899. He wanted to show that what we perceive depends not just on our direct visual perception, but on our mental activity. The brain starts to work as soon as you look at the picture. Look at the picture for one second.

What do you see?

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Duck-Rabbit_illusion
Image Source

What do you see? A duck? A rabbit? Or both?

This illusion was sketched over a hundred years ago, but has recently gained momentum on social media, The Independent reports. Some people see a duck, some see a rabbit, and some see both.

What you see in this drawing, and perhaps above all how quickly you see it, shows how fast your brain works and how creative you are. The faster you see both animals and can switch between them, the quicker your brain works and the more creative you are, Jastrow’s research shows. The animal that most people see tends to shift at different times of the year. Around Easter, for example, more people see the bunny first.

What animal did you see? And how quickly did you see it? Please share this optical illusion with your friends and find out how creative they are!

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